Above photograph taken by Craig Short Photography 

Edited by Karen McDonald

It was as part of her work for this site that she came up with the idea of The Bow Street Society. Though The Case of the Curious Client is a project independent from the website the time she spent as a member of staff there helped her better understand character formation/evolution, effective use of description, and clue-puzzle mystery plot mechanics. 

Become her friend, ask her a question, and leave a review of her work!

Tahnee Georgina (T.G.) Campbell wrote her first crime fiction story at the age of sixteen as a gift for her best friend. At only 40 pages long it fell considerably short of a “novel” but it marked the beginning of a creative journey that would eventually spawn the first of the Bow Street Society mystery novels; The Case of the Curious Client.  During that time she attended the University of Winchester where she acquired her Bachelor of Arts Degree in English Studies and wrote a dissertation on the social and cultural importance of the works of Agatha Christie.

She also became a volunteer member of staff on an international text-based gaming website where she was responsible for creating, and facilitating,  storyline-games in a Victorian Era setting.  The historical content of the reference pages for this setting were therefore researched, collated, and maintained by her.

Above photograph taken by Craig Short Photography 

Edited by Karen McDonald

​T.G. CAMPBELL IS ALSO ON GOODREADS :-

Aside from writing the Bow Street Society novels Tahnee also writes monthly features for Fresh Lifestyle Magazine. She has also launched a new sub-series of short stories featuring the Society called the Bow Street Society Casebook. 


She also enjoys visiting museums. As part of her research for the Bow Street Society books she visited the Operating Theatre & Herb Garret, the Metropolitan Police Heritage Centre, and had a guided tour of the Magic Circle’s Headquarters in London. She recently visited the Crime Museum: Uncovered exhibition at the London Museum where she bought several books, a commemorative mug, and the Scotland Yard board game from the gift shop. She likes to buy a commemorative mug from every museum/public attraction she visits but ONLY if it has the attraction’s name printed on it. Needless to say she’s built quite the collection but is never short of a cup if a friend drops by unexpectedly! She and her friends also like to arrange ‘themed’ days/evenings out in which they wear fancy dress and visit places in keeping with said theme. In the past they’ve organised a Victorian themed day out in London where, dressed as Victorian women, they visited the Charles Dickens museum, the Sherlock Holmes museum, had afternoon tea, and finished off with a Jack the Ripper walk around Whitechapel.  She keeps a sepia photograph of her and her friends, in costume, pinned to her noticeboard to remind her of that day while she writes.